Outline of Matthew 5:13-17

What follows is the second of  a four part series of teaching or preaching outlines for Matthew 5

 


 

Matthew 5:13-17

I.     Intro: People who love Christ, who are going to inherit the kingdom of God have certain responsibilities.

II.  People who love God are salt of the earth. (Mt 5:13a)

a.    Salt is something the body needs. Without salt, you die.

b.    Salt is a cleansing agent.

c.    Salt is seasoning.

d.    Salt is a preservative.

III.         Salt without saltiness is worthless and we must strive for righteousness (Mt 5:13b)

IV. People who love God are light of the world (My 5:14-16)

a.    Can’t be hidden.

b.    Light is MEANT to be obvious.

c.    Light protects.

d.    Light illuminates the dark

e.    Everyone needs light.

f.     Light is for everyone.

g.    In the same way, your life should reflect God’s grace and love, so He can get glory and praise.

V.   Conclusion: Ultimately, if you claim Christ as Lord and Savior, your life should reflect Christ. You should be filled with love. God’s love should shine through you.

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6 Responses

  1. RIGHT! That is true! I haven’t thought of that too much. I like your outline, Hey thanks for helping me with gmcastil…we’ve been going at it for a long time now. :-( I just can’t get through to him.

  2. Thanks.

    gmcastil seems to want an easy believism. I had a professor one time who also wanted this. He is a brillliant man, but has a relative who had made a profession of faith and then later began to follow an ungodly lifestyle. His conclusion: making a profession of faith will cause you to change, but sometimes for the worse.

    This is the danger we fall into when we try to interpret scripture based upon our experience. So gmcastil has a good warning when he states we have to get out of our preconceived framework to study the Bible. But his problem is he does not want to compare scripture with scripture, to ensure one has not misinterpreted what they are studying. Just pray for him.

  3. Actually, I’ve not really said any of the things you’ve mentioned. A profession of faith doesn’t save a person. Believing in Jesus saves a person.

    As far as “comparing scripture with scripture”, you seem to misunderstand me again. Comparing Scripture as you describe is an illicit method of hermeneutics. While it’s true that two passages can’t be teaching contradictory things, that doesn’t mean that, for example, one needs to use James in order to interpret the Gospel of John. If we had to use a book written by a different author, to a different audience, at a different time, in order to understand John, then how could John’s original audience ever have hoped to understand him?

    Of course, it’s highly unlikely that either of you will consider my statements or consider my position.

    Just can’t get through to him.

    You might start by considering my view, then. If I’m so clearly interpreting a passage wrong, can you show me how without resorting to an unrelated prooftext?

  4. GMCastil,

    True belief changes one. I’m not saying people wont sin if they truly believe in Christ as their savior, sent by God to suffer and die to pay for their sins. Paul was clear about carnal Christians. But I AM saying scripture says if we believe, we will change and not live a pattern of sin.

    It is true that it is not necessary to interpret one piece of scripture with another, except to ensure that what you think the original human author was saying will not contradict other scripture (since God is the actual author) – its a check point. It is a commonly accepted hermenuetical practice to ensure one does not begin to teach errancy. If what you claim scripture teaches in one area contradicts scripture in another area, then you are mistaken.

    I think I HAVE considered my understanding of your position, that one can believe in Christ as their savior, and live a life how ever they wish, sinfully willful or not, and still go to heaven. If I am mistaken in your position, then please help me understand.

    I think scripture is clear in numerous places that we must place God above all else if we are saved, that we will live a life that reflects a growing holiness towards God.

  5. If what you claim scripture teaches in one area contradicts scripture in another area, then you are mistaken.

    Absolutely. Here’s an example. You claim that anyone that fails to persevere in faith and good works was never saved to begin with. How do you explain the believers that Paul refers to in 1 Cor. 11:29-32? These believers were rebellious, failed to respond to God’s discipline, and were eventually taken prematurely to be with the Lord. These were regenerate people that failed to persevere in a life of good works and God killed them.

    It is a commonly accepted hermenuetical practice to ensure one does not begin to teach errancy.

    But this isn’t what you’re doing. Let me illustrate with an example. James plainly says we are justified by works and not by faith alone. The vast majority of Christians – including Jacob in his recent statements about this passage – feel a need to interpret James through the lens of Paul and they use the notion of “scripture interpreting scripture” to do it. But, it’s neither natural or proper to leap to another book explain what James means – if his original audience couldn’t have done that, why do we feel that we can!

    We should strive to understand James as his audience would have. When he says that we are declared to be righteous by our works, he’s telling the truth. He doesn’t say that faith must produce works to be saving faith. He says that if we put our faith into practice, then we will be justified by works. Anyone that has believed in Jesus is justified by faith, before God – that’s what Paul would say. A believer that puts his faith into practice is justified works, before men – that’s what James tells us.

    Incidentally, this is why James offers Abraham as the example of someone that has done both. He offers the demons as an example of those that believe in the one God but refuse to alter their behavior. I have grown exceedingly weary of those using the demons as an example in discussion about salvation. It’s totally illicit, since a) Jesus didn’t die for demons and b) God hasn’t extended redemption to the angels. Regardless, the text isn’t talking about salvation at all – James is writing to believers and telling them to put their faith into practice. The only way this can be unclear from the text is to approach it with the Reformed doctrines on faith and perseverance firmly set in the mind and read them into the text.

    Why is grace so difficult to accept? Why do we feel compelled to preach, on the one hand of the riches of God’s grace, but require a life of perseverance on the other? Have you considered the possibility that the New Testament might not be teaching what you think just because every book on Christian living says so?

    This Reformed notion of perseverance is an affront to God’s grace and the salvation that He freely offers. If we evaluate ourselves honestly, we have to conclude that even the most holy among us haven’t persevered in holiness. What Christian hasn’t persevered in pride or jealousy until the end of their life? Some might say, “But I’ve seen change and growth” – that doesn’t change anything. But any differences that exist in sin among the saints is a matter of degrees and anyone that has placed their faith in Christ, from the most carnal to the most holy has eternal life.

  6. “You claim that anyone that fails to persevere in faith and good works was never saved to begin with. How do you explain the believers that Paul refers to in 1 Cor. 11:29-32? These believers were rebellious, failed to respond to God’s discipline, and were eventually taken prematurely to be with the Lord. These were regenerate people that failed to persevere in a life of good works and God killed them.”

    1 Corinthians 11 does not speak to loosing salvation. It speaks to God protecting His Church and disciplining His children.

    Don’t confuse people who falter in living their faith with people who dont ever show evidence of faith.

    I see James, Paul, and John all saying the same thing: faith and evidence of faith go hand in hand. They just said it in different ways. James said faith without deeds is dead (James 2:14:26). Paul said we are to repent, turn to God, and prove our repentance with deeds (Acts 26:20). John said if we claim know Christ but do not obey Him, we lie (1 John 1:1-2:6).

    I see a distinction between persevering in faith and persevering in holiness. I agree, we’re all sinners. None of us are perfect. But there’s a difference between

    I agree we must believe, and nothing else, to be saved. But I think John, Paul and James all said that if we have faith, then we will have deeds. Our faith will be expressed in our lives, or its not faith.

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